Title

Quad Core Burn-In/Performance Tests Windows 7

Contents

Summary General System Information
Temperature Monitor IntBurn64 Description IntBurn64 Results
SSEBurn64 Description SSEBurn64 Results Livermore Loops
VideoD3D9_64 and CPUs Other Tests Benchmark Source and Results

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Summary

Tests were run on a new PC, with a 3 GHz Phenom II processor, a GeForce GTS 250 graphics card and Widows 7, to measure system temperatures and multiprocessor performance. Temperature measurement available were CPU case, CPU core, motherboard and graphics processor. A slightly up market copper heatpipe CPU cooler was fitted, and this might explain why the CPU case temperature, normally at room temperature + 13C when idling, only increased by a maximum of 14C. Initially, the processor ran at 800 MHz and the first 2C rise was almost instantaneous with the CPU switching to full speed. Maximum temperature was often reached within 5 minutes. Reported CPU core temperatures were lower than those for the case but increases under load were higher. It then became apparent that the reported core temperatures are not real but used purely for thermal management purposes, with a maximum value of 70C.

IntBurn64 - this carries out 64 bit integer arithmetic with high speed data from caches or RAM. Four different sizes were used for data in dedicated L1 and L2 caches, shared L3 cache and RAM, to use one then four processors. With dedicated caches, average throughput gains in using four CPUs was 3.94. The L1 cache test produced the highest speeds at 17,914 Millions of Instructions Per Second (MIPS) but maximum case/core temperature increases of 14/18C were produced by the L2 cache test, at up to 12,613 MIPS. For the L3 cache tests, each processor requested 1 MB of the 6 MB shared space. Resulting gains on using four CPUs averaged 3.5 times. Temperatures were similar to those for L1 cache tests. RAM speed with one CPU was less than a third of possible maximum data transfer rate but achieved 68%, or 14.5 GB/second, using four processors.

SSEBurn64 - this uses SSE or SSE2 floating point instructions and has CPU only and L1 cache tests, with resultant speeds measured in Millions of FLOating Point instructions per Second (MFLOPS). Maximum 32 bit SSE MFLOPS for a 3 GHz processor is 12,000, or possibly 24,000 with linked add and multiply instructions. Maximum 64 bit SSE2 MFLOPS are half those for SSE. Memory size has to be specified for other tests that stress caches or RAM, with results calculated as MB/second. Performance gains, using four processors, were similar to the integer tests. The SSE CPU test, using registers instead of cache, ran at nearly 12,000 MFLOPS on each CPU but temperature increases were the lowest. The SSE Cache test generated 16,400 MFLOPS per CPU and produced the same high temperatures as those with the integer tests. Memory Tests - L2 cache tests gave rise to the highest temperatures of this group, with a data transfer speed half that using L1 cache.

Livermore Loops - This was the original key benchmark for supercomputers, having 24 kernels of numerical applications with speeds calculated in MFLOPS. The benchmark was known to produced errors on an earlier overclocked processor. Here, maximum temperatures were moderately high, with four CPU each running at up to nearly 3900 MFLOPS (i387 instructions not SSE type).

VideoD3D9 - This is a DirectX 9 benchmark where any one of the 8 tests can be run as a burn-in program at a specified window size. Speeds are recorded in Frames Per Second (FPS). The tests were run individually to find the hottest one. This was then run at the same time as three SSE Cache tests. Recorded temperature increases were just about the highest - Case +14 to 48C, Core +19 to 45C, Board +3 to 36C and Graphic Processor +26 to 69C. SSE MFLOPS were degraded somewhat, as the graphics test uses the equivalent of 120% CPU utilisation.

Other Tests - The graphics/SSE test was repeated using integrated Radeon HD 4200 graphics on the Asus motherboard. The results were much lower temperatures and FPS but higher MFLOPS. CUDA provides nVidia programming extensions to use a GPU for general purpose computing. The test using these ran at 159,600 MFLOPS with temperature of the GPU changing by +30 to 73C. OpenMP functions enable shared data calculations over available CPUs. The MS compiler is not efficient in translating to SSE instructions, only achieving 3700 MFLOPS on one CPU and 14,446 MFLOPS using four, with associated low temperature increases. A game benchmark was run a number of times and this increased GPU temperature by 29C. It used more than three CPUs but heating effects were not high.


To Start


Reliability or Burn-in Benchmarks

This report provides results of a series of performance and reliability tests on a 3.0 GHz Phenom II X4 CPU using 64-Bit Windows 7. The hardware comprises a 4 processor Phenom II 945 on an Asus M4A785TD-V motherboard, with 8 GB DCDDR3 RAM, a WD 5400 RPM Green SATA disk and a GeForce GTS 250 graphics card, plus Radeon HD 4200 on the motherboard. The processor has a Titan TTC-NK34TZ "Super Quiet 22dBA Triple Copper heatpipe CPU Cooler".

Reliability/Burn-in programs used were mainly compiled for 64 bit working, including tests using integer instructions, DirectX 3D graphics functions and floating point arithmetic calculations. CPU, motherboard and graphics processor temperatures were recorded as each test was run. Besides being used for stress testing, the programs provide useful performance information of multi-core processors. These results are saved in text log files, examples being given below. The compiled programs, source code, descriptions and performance results on numerous systems can be obtained via the links given below.


To Start


System Information

All my latest benchmarks and test programs include the following, where Windows NT Version 6.1, build 7600 indicates Windows 7. Memory shown could be 8192 MB but, with integrated graphics enabled, this is reduced by 256 MB.

Data cache sizes for this processor are L1 64 KB dedicated, L2 512 KB dedicated, L3 6 MB shared.


  Hardware  Information
   CPU AuthenticAMD, Features Code 178BFBFF, Model Code 00100F42
   AMD Phenom(tm) II X4 945 Processor Measured 3013 MHz
   Has MMX, Has SSE, Has SSE2, Has SSE3, Has 3DNow, 
  Windows  Information
   AMD64 processor architecture, 4 CPUs 
   Windows NT  Version 6.1, build 7600, 
   Memory 7936 MB, Free 6403 MB
   User Virtual Space 8388608 MB, Free 8388561 MB

To Start


Temperature Monitor

During the tests, CPU case and core temperatures were measured using CPUID Hardware Monitor and, when applicable, confirmed using Asus Probe II. The accuracy of these measurements is unknown and the temperatures and increases seem particularly low. Below is an example of maximum monitored temperatures using 4 CPUs, with room air at 21C. The core temperatures are very low when the CPUs are idle, but suddenly increase significantly when the tests are started. Core voltage also increases from 0.93V to 1.3V. CPUZ indicated that that CPU was running at 800 MHz when idle, increasing to 3.0 GHz. Core/Case temperatures with the CPU running at 3 GHz, but idling, were typically around 4C/ 2C higher than at the lower MHz. All measurements produced maximum temperatures on the same sort of time scale and Prime95 showed similar maximum temperature.

Turning off CoolnQuiet in BIOS increases CPU idling speed to 3 GHz and, at the same room temperature, case and core temperatures to 36C and 30C respectively. These temperatures were also confirmed after installing AMDs OverDrive utility. It was then found that there is only one Core measurement that is known as Tctl Processor Temperature Control Value. It does not represent an actual temperature but is a relative reading that can be used for thermal management. Maximum value is 70C.

    CPUID Hardware Monitor

                Value    Min     Max

    CPU VCore   0.94 V  0.93 V  1.30 V
   Temperatures
    CPU case     35 C   34 C   47 C
    Motherboard  33 C   33 C   34 C
   Fans
    CPU     RPM  2732    2721    2755
    Fan 2   RPM  1280    1273    1293
   Temperatures
    Core #0      26 C   25 C   43 C 
    Core #1      26 C   25 C   43 C 
    Core #2      26 C   25 C   43 C 
    Core #3      26 C   25 C   43 C 
    

To Start


IntBurn64 Reliability Test

This program uses assembly code and eight 64 bit integer registers (r8 to r15) that are not used with 32 bit code. It has twelve tests, adding and subtracting different data patterns. The first six tests alternately write and read data and the others are read only. The results are checked for correct calculations. Drop down lists are provided to select memory size used, between 4 KB and RAM size minus 64 MB, to test using data in L1 cache, L2 cache or RAM. Another list allows running time to be selected between 1 and 1000 seconds per test. An example of the log file is shown below.

For testing multiple processors, the program can also be run via commands in a BAT file that also has options to display the run time window at different screen positions and to save results in different log files. Example commands to use four CPUs are included below.


  Test 4 KB at 5 seconds per test, Start at Wed Nov 25 13:49:00 2009

  Write/Read
  1   17857 MB/sec  Pattern 0000000000000000 	 Result OK  10898787 passes
  2   18014 MB/sec  Pattern 0000000000000000 	 Result OK  10994602 passes
  3   18027 MB/sec  Pattern A5A5A5A5A5A5A5A5 	 Result OK  11002711 passes
  4   17687 MB/sec  Pattern AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 	 Result OK  10795160 passes
  5   17659 MB/sec  Pattern CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 	 Result OK  10778002 passes
  6   18089 MB/sec  Pattern 0F0F0F0F0F0F0F0F 	 Result OK  11040616 passes
 Max   3816 64 bit MIPS
 Read
  1   30453 MB/sec  Pattern 0000000000000000 	 Result OK  37174500 passes
  2   30445 MB/sec  Pattern FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF 	 Result OK  37164100 passes
  3   30425 MB/sec  Pattern A5A5A5A5A5A5A5A5 	 Result OK  37139800 passes
  4   30443 MB/sec  Pattern 5555555555555555 	 Result OK  37161800 passes
  5   30418 MB/sec  Pattern 3333333333333333 	 Result OK  37131500 passes
  6   30455 MB/sec  Pattern F0F0F0F0F0F0F0F0 	 Result OK  37177000 passes
 Max   4521 64 bit MIPS

                 Example commands to test four CPUs:

           Start IntBurn64 Auto, KB 4, Secs 25, P1, Log qL11.txt
           Start IntBurn64 Auto, KB 4, Secs 25, P2, Log qLl2.txt
           Start IntBurn64 Auto, KB 4, Secs 25, P3, Log qLl3.txt
           Start IntBurn64 Auto, KB 4, Secs 25, P4, Log qLl4.txt

To Start


IntBurn64 MP Performance and Temperatures

The following show performance levels in MBytes per second and temperature increases, running four copies of IntBurn64 at the same time, plus the speed using one CPU. The total data transmission rates are calculated, performance gains using four processors and Millions of Instructions Per Second (MIPS) from known instruction counts. Optional data size parameters used were 4 KB, 256 KB, 1 MB and 64 MB. The tests were run for 5 minutes, the one producing the highest temperature gains repeated for 10 minutes.

Multi-processor performance, using data in L1 and L2 caches, is as good as might be expected and better than expectations, sharing L3 cache space. The highest data throughput from RAM requires demands from more than one processor.

                                                                        Temperature
 Test         1 CPU  Copy1  Copy2  Copy3  Copy4  Total   Gain  Total   Case Core MBrd
               MB/s   MB/s   MB/s   MB/s   MB/s   MB/s          MIPS    34C 26C 33C
 L1 Cache
 Write/Read   17889  17482  16402  17643  17543  69070   3.86  14571   +12  +16   +1
 Read Only    30440  30181  29963  30200  30329 120673   3.96  17914

 L2 Cache - 10 minutes
 Write/Read   14744  14722  14563  14694  14470  58449   3.96  12330   +14  +18   +1
 Read Only    21426  21394  21205  21377  21007  84983   3.97  12613

 L3 Cache
 Write/Read    9464   8798   8812   8712   8699  35021   3.70   7389   +14  +16   +2
 Read Only    11364   9289   9310   9392   9227  37218   3.28   5526

 RAM
 Write/Read    5280   2250   2242   2235   2236   8963   1.70   1891    +9  +12    0
 Read Only     6228   3632   3609   3630   3632  14503   2.33   2153

       Adjust for idle temperature at maximum core volts and CPU GHz    -2   -4

       Typical room air 21C, case 34C and core 26C idling at low GHz

  Four processors each executing one instruction per cycle would produce 12000 MIPS
     

To Start


SSEBurn64

SSEBurn64 uses SSE or SSE2 Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) floating point instructions to soak test the CPU, Cache or RAM at high speeds whilst checking results for correct values. SSE and SSE2 Run buttons are provided for separate CPU, Cache and RAM tests. The program produces 1024 random floating point numbers used in all tests. For the CPU test, 32 add or multiply instructions manipulate a few at a time from registers within a loop. The Cache test uses the same 32 instructions but with data from L1 cache within the main loop. The RAM test is biased towards fast data transfer and can also use cache sized data. Every fifth pass the memory is filled with 16 or 32 of the random numbers with the first set being read and checked for correctness. The main loop uses 8 load/add and 8 load/subtract instructions to produce a sum check of zero. CPU and Cache tests check that results are the same as the first pass which also calibrates the testing loops to run for up to one second (on a fast CPU).

Drop down lists are provided to select running time (1 minute to 24 hours), and memory size used, between 4 KB and 4 MB for Cache tests and 4 KB to 8192 MB for RAM tests. The former is a L1 cache test, using part of the data in turn. The latter is for testing using data in L1 cache, L2 cache or RAM. Speed of CPU and Cache tests is measured in Millions of Floating Point Operations Per Second (MFLOPS) with results for the RAM test in MBytes/second. An example of the log file is shown below.


 #########################################################################
            SSE and SSE2 Reliability Test Version 1.0 for 64 bit OS
 
 SSE CPU Test at 5 minutes, Start at Sat Nov 28 14:26:25 2009

     1.01 Minutes at 12020 MFLOPS, No Errors
     2.01 Minutes at 12022 MFLOPS, No Errors
     3.00 Minutes at 12022 MFLOPS, No Errors
     4.01 Minutes at 12023 MFLOPS, No Errors
     5.01 Minutes at 12023 MFLOPS, No Errors

  Reliability Test Ended Sat Nov 28 14:31:25 2009


 SSE Cache Test at 5 minutes and 4 KB, Start at Sat Nov 28 14:50:34 2009

     1.01 Minutes at 16792 MFLOPS, No Errors


 SSE Memory Test at 5 minutes and 32 KB, Start at Sat Nov 28 15:06:29 2009

 Pass 1 write & read 0.0328 MB, 0.0655 Total MB in 0.00018555 Seconds =  353 MB/Sec
 Pass 2 read only    0.0328 MB, 0.0328 Total MB in 0.00000408 Seconds = 8035 MB/Sec

     1.00 Minutes at 47465 MB/Sec, No Errors

                 Example commands to test four CPUs:

          Start SSEBurn64 SSE, CPU, Mins 5, auto, P1, Log TCP1.txt
          Start SSEBurn64 SSE, CPU, Mins 5, auto, P2, Log TCP2.txt
          Start SSEBurn64 SSE, CPU, Mins 5, auto, P3, Log TCP3.txt
          Start SSEBurn64 SSE, CPU, Mins 5, auto, P4, Log TCP4.txt

                    Other example commands:

          Start SSEBurn64 SSE2, CPU, Mins 5, auto, P1, Log Tests1.txt
          Start SSEBurn64 SSE, Cache, KB 4, Mins 10, auto, P2, Log Tstx4.txt
          Start SSEBurn64 SSE, RAM, KB 65536, Mins 5, auto, P3, Log Testrams2.txt
          Start SSEBurn64 SSE, RAM, KB 1024, Mins 5, auto, P4, Log TestramL34.txt


To Start


SSEBurn64 MP Performance and Temperatures

Following are performance details in MFLOPS and MBytes per second, along with temperature increases, running four copies of SSEBurn64 at the same time, plus the speeds using one CPU. Total MFLOPS or MB/second are shown for four processors and performance gain ratios. Tests indicating highest temperature increases were again run for 10 minutes. Temperature increases and multi-processor performance gains are similar to IntBurn64 above.

Maximum SSE speed in MFLOPS, executing such as add or multiply, is four times CPU MHz, 4 x 3000 or 12000 MFLOPS in this case. The cache tests use multiply followed by add, demonstrating more that 16000 MFLOPS per CPU. Maximum SSE2 64 bit floating point speeds are half those using 32 bit SSE instructions.


                                                                    Temperature
 Test           1 CPU  Copy1  Copy2  Copy3  Copy4  Total   Gain     Case Core Mbrd
                Mflps  Mflps  Mflps  Mflps  Mflps  Mflps            34C 26C 33C

 CPU            12022  11931  11901  11867  12007  47706   3.97     +7  +11   +1
 Cache SSE  10m 16802  16478  16466  16381  16410  65735   3.91    +13  +18   +1
 Cache SSE2 10m  8258   8090   8107   8166   8103  32465   3.93    +14  +18   +1
 
                 MB/s   MB/s   MB/s   MB/s   MB/s   MB/s 
  
 L1 32KB        47484  47109  46907  47553  47222 188791   3.98    +11  +15   +1
 L2 256KB 10m   23919  23577  23907  23807  23690  94980   3.97    +13  +17   +1
 L3 1024KB      11250   9171   9225   9264   9224  36884   3.28    +11  +14   +0
 RAM 64MB        7041   3708   3796   3756   3730  14990   2.13    +10  +14   +1

  Adjust for idle temperature at maximum core volts and CPU GHz     -2   -4

  Typical room air 21C, case 34C and core 26C idling at low GHz
     


To Start


Livermore Loops

This was the original key benchmark for supercomputers, having 24 kernels of numerical applications with speeds calculated in Millions of Floating Point Operations Per Second or MFLOPS. Overall performance characteristics are identified by geometric, harmonic and arithmetic means, minimum and maximum. The program also checks the results for computational accuracy and this was adopted to check for consistent numeric results for a burn-in test.

Multi-processor tests can be run using the commands shown below with results written to a common log file (that appears to work). The 24 kernels are run three times. So, at 5 seconds per test, total running time should be around six minutes. The benchmark was converted to a burn-in test as the original was known to produce incorrect numeric results on overclocked Pentium Pro CPUs. In this case, maximum temperatures were not as high as the other tests.

   
                                                           Temperature
         Maximum  Average  Geomean  Harmean  Minimum     Case   Core   Mbrd
          MFLOPS  MFLOPS    MFLOPS   MFLOPS   MFLOPS     34C   26C   33C 

  1 CPU     3883     1070      644      384       64			
								
  Copy 1    3866     1064      641      383       64    +11    +16     +1
  Copy 2    3832     1059      637      380       63			
  Copy 3    3838     1062      639      382       64			
  Copy 4    3878     1066      641      382       64 


   Expected End Messages

   Numeric results were as expected


   Commands for four CPUs

   Start LiveCONT RunSecs 5
   Start LiveCONT RunSecs 5
   Start LiveCONT RunSecs 5
   Start LiveCONT RunSecs 5

To Start


VideoD3D9_64 and SSEBurn64

VideoD3D9 is a DirectX 9 benchmark where any one of the 8 tests can be run as a burn-in test at a specified window size. Speeds are logged in Frames Per Second (FPS) over each minute of the tests. With the CPU burn-in and Direct3D tests in the same folder, a BAT file, with the commands shown below, can run them both at the same time. Firstly, all DirectX 9 tests were run individually for 5 minutes at 1680 x 1050 pixel monitor setting to identify the hottest test. Perfmon performance monitor was run at the same time to log CPU utilisation, where that recorded is average per CPU.

Next, The Vertex Shader routine and three copies of SSEBurn64 cache tests were run for 10 minutes. The former produced 30% CPU utilisation or 120% of one CPU. This was reflected in multiprocessor performance, where MFLOPS per CPU was reduced from around 16,500 to 13,600. Maximum CPU case and motherboard temperatures were just about the highest at 48C and 36C. Asus Probe II monitor has default maximum settings of 77C and 60C but the AMD specification for the former appears to be 71C. Maximum GeForce GTS 250 temperatures are shown as 105C, 69C being recorded for these tests.

The graphics and three CPU test was repeated using the slower motherboard integrated graphics. This did not even lead to a larger increase in board temperature and and only produced low CPU utilisation.

     
                                       Case   Core  Board    GPU   % CPU
                               FPS     34C   26C   33C   43C    Util
  
  1. Egg Gouraud shading      2425     +6     +8     +2    +23       12
  2. Wireframe egg Vsync        60     +2     +5     +2     +5        6
  3. Wireframe 500 Cubes       182     +2     +5     +1    +22       13
  4. Textured Tunnel           873     +6     +9     +2    +25       12
  5. Plain Colour Objects     1331     +7    +10     +1    +24       24
  6. Textured Objects          825     +7    +10     +1    +24       22
  7. Pixel Shader              773     +6     +9     +1    +23       21
  8. Vertex Shader            1044     +8    +11     +2    +25       30

  
  Graphics and 3 x SSE - GeForce GTS 250 1680 x 1050
                               FPS
                        and MFLOPS

  8. Vertex Shader            1032    +14    +19     +3    +26       95
  3 x SSEBurn64              40896 

  
  Graphics and 3 x SSE - On board Radeon HD 4200 1280 x 1024
                               FPS
                        and MFLOPS

  8. Vertex Shader             153    +13    +16     +2              80
  3 x SSEBurn64              46801 


  BAT File Commands

  Start VideoD3D9_64 Auto, Width 1680, Height 1050, Test 2, Secs 600, P1
  Start SSEBurn64 SSE, Cache, KB 4, Mins 10, auto, P2, Log X2stx2.txt
  Start SSEBurn64 SSE, Cache, KB 4, Mins 10, auto, P3, Log X2stx3.txt
  Start SSEBurn64 SSE, Cache, KB 4, Mins 10, auto, P4, Log X2stx4.txt


  Example Results

  SSE Cache Test at 10 minutes and 4 KB, Start at Thu Dec 03 16:36:34 2009
  1.01 Minutes at 13668 MFLOPS, No Errors
  2.00 Minutes at 13662 MFLOPS, No Errors

  DirectX9 D3D Test 64 Bit Version 1.1, Thu Dec 03 16:36:34 2009
  Vertex Shader 2.0 at 1680 x 1050 x 32 bits
  1028.5 Frames Per Second over 60 seconds
  1031.2 Frames Per Second over 60 seconds
     

To Start


Other Tests

CUDA, from nVidia, provides programming functions to use GeForce graphics processors for general purpose computing. These functions are easy to use in executing arithmetic instructions on numerous processing elements simultaneously. As a benchmark, tests are run using different data sizes and increasing numbers floating point calculations per data element, with and without transferring data from/to main processor RAM. The reliability test uses calculate only with 32 calculations per word.

OpenMP is a system independent set of procedures and software that arranges automatic parallel processing of shared memory data when more than one processor is provided. This option is available in the latest Microsoft C++ compilers. Potential performance gains due to hardware SIMD with SSE instructions are not realised due to compiler limitations and this enhances the comparative benefit of CUDA GPU parallel processing. The benchmark executes the same range of functions, using the same data sizes, as the CUDA benchmark, but only with data in and out.

OpenMP tests at least show that a quad processor can achieve up to a near four times performance gain over a single CPU, but the relative slow speed leads to low temperature increases. CPU temperatures are even lower with the CUDA test, with processor utilisation equivalent to 100% of one CPU. On the other hand, that huge MFLOPS speed gives rise to the highest graphics processor temperature. For further details of these programs, see references below.

Game - Grand Theft Auto IV built-in benchmark was run (only running for 4 to 5 minutes in 10). This fully utilised more than 3 CPUs, not particularly generating a lot of CPU heat but giving rise to a 29C increase on the GPU. A fast game player might have more impact.

     
                                       Case   Core  Board    GPU   % CPU
                            MFLOPS     34C   26C   33C   43C    Util
  
  CUDA Graphics Processing  159600     +6    +11     +2    +30       25

  OpenMP 4 CPUs maximum      14446     +9    +14     +1     +2
  CPU Utilisation average                                            88

  OpenMP 1 CPU  maximum       3700 

  Grand Theft Auto IV   FPS     47    +10    +14     +3    +29       86        
     

To Start


Reference Files

SSEBurn64 and IntBurn64 - Benchmark and source code in More64Bit.zip - Further results and description in BurnIn64.htm

Livermore Loops - Benchmark and source code in Benchnt.zip - Results and description in Livermore Loops Results.htm

VideoD3D9_64 - Benchmark and source code in Video64.zip - Further results and description in 64 Bit Graphics Tests.htm and Direct3D Results.htm

CUDA - Benchmark and source code in CudaMFLOPS.zip - Further results and description in Cuda1.htm

OpenMP - Benchmark and source code in OpenMPMFLOPS.zip - Further results and description in OpenMP MFLOPS.htm

Other - Burnin32.htm, Burnin64.htm, Vista64.htm, Win64.htm



To Start






Roy Longbottom December 2009

The new Internet Home for my PC Benchmarks is via the link
Roy Longbottom's PC Benchmark Collection